2021 CHI Poster Hall

Aug 20, 2021 ‐ Aug 24, 2021



Sessions

Preparing for Pandemics: Lesson Plan Design for Elementary-Aged Children

Aug 19, 2021 12:00am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:00am

Identification: CP1

CP1 - Preparing for Pandemics: Lesson Plan Design for Elementary-Aged Children

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University;Patient and Community Engagment

Research Objectives: The purpose of this project was to implement education-based interventions via distanced learning about infectious diseases and pandemics to elementary-aged children. We aimed to evaluate the success of the online distribution and ultimately contribute to increased health knowledge.

Research Study Design/Methods: Our four-week program of weekly lessons was provided to 61 fifth-grade students. Each lesson included a 10–15-minute recorded instructional video and pre-quiz to be completed on Mondays, a 1-hour live, online, interactive session on Wednesdays, and a post-quiz completed on Fridays. Topics included: 1) basic understanding of microbes, 2) how germs spread, 3) preventing and treating disease, and 4) specifics of COVID-19. The students also completed surveys before and after the program to evaluate knowledge integration. Both surveys and all pre-post quizzes were sent and collected via the school’s online portal.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: Overall, response rates varied, but an increase in correct responses on post-quizzes was found, demonstrating engagement and an increased understanding of topics. The response rates for the weekly pre vs post-quizzes are as follows: 56 vs 40 responses; 54 vs 49; 46 vs 39; 43 vs 39. Despite online curriculum delivery and distractions of learning at home, students seemed engaged during live sessions. Further analysis is being done to determine which topics the students learned most about and how confident they feel in their knowledge of infectious disease after the lessons.

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: These results suggest that interactive, evidence-based lesson plans help fifth grade students learn about infectious disease and related subjects. Although it was difficult to maintain the same response rate in the weekly quizzes and focused participation during the virtual lesson, engaging activities during the live sessions held students’ attention and improved their understanding in these areas. This can provide children with greater confidence on how to navigate pandemics or similar scenarios in the future. This project design may also be adapted to other grade levels at schools across the country to promote awareness about pandemics or other global issues.

Authors:

Roxana Nouri-Nikbakht, MA, ATSU SOMA

Benjamin Finch, ATSU SOMA

Brittany Vaughn-Pierce, ATSU SOMA

Addison Hill, ATSU SOMA

Saleem Choudry, ATSU SOMA

Erin Herbert, ATSU SOMA

Sean Hollebeck, ATSU SOMA

Issa Ismail, ATSU SOMA

Daniella Rivera, ATSU SOMA

Zachery Sanders, ATSU SOMA

Steve Sainbayar, ATSU SOMA

Mark Sivakoff, MD, ATSU SOMA

Bradley Meek, MD, ATSU SOMA

Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):

Prioritizing Preventative Health in Older Adults Residing in Long-Term Care Facilities Through Vaccination

Aug 19, 2021 12:01am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:01am

Identification: CP2

CP2 - Prioritizing Preventative Health in Older Adults Residing in Long-Term Care Facilities Through Vaccination

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement

Research Objectives: Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) house adults who require acute rehabilitation or long-term high-level care. Influenza and pneumonia cause 90% of deaths in adults 65+; only 42-66% of Pennsylvania LTCF residents receive these vaccinations. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, we aimed to identify perceived barriers to vaccination in LTCFs across Pennsylvania.

Research Study Design/Methods: LTCFs located in Pennsylvania, identified by zip-code, were contacted via publicly available contact information and administrators were asked to participate in an anonymous phone survey designed to gather information regarding vaccination practices. Our survey contained questions and discussion prompts designed to assess the following: how vaccines are recorded, what information is recorded, how charts are checked for vaccination gaps, the vaccination process, and perceived barriers to vaccination.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: Of 406 eligible LTCFs, 109 were contacted and 22 agreed to participate (20.2%). Thirteen centers reported use of electronic records; 7 use both paper and electronic records. Vaccine records reportedly included patient identifying information (95.2%), injection site (76.1%), injection information (38.1%), and vaccination history (90.5%). Methods for vaccine tracking included chart reviews (28.6%), electronic alerts (42.9%), scheduled audits (38.1%), and vaccination at admission (19%). The most common vaccination process involved a physician ordering and administered by a nurse (57.1%). The main barriers perceived by more than half of participants included lack of patient education and issues with vaccine acquisition.

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: Although vaccination is vital to preventative health, 52.4% of LTCFs perceived barriers in vaccinating their residents. We determined a baseline understanding of how LTCFs track vaccination status and perceived barriers they face in getting residents vaccinated. Individual LTCFs can examine their own system to understand gaps they may face in vaccinations. Given the importance of vaccination in bringing an end to the COVID-19 pandemic, recognizing potential impediments to achieving higher vaccination rates in such a vulnerable population is essential. Future research projects could look at steps that can be taken to overcome these barriers and ultimately increase vaccination rates.

Authors:

Aishwarya Majumdar, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Catherine Lau, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Tanisha Mitra, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Alonso Abugattas, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Margaret McGrath, OMS-II, A. T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Christopher Vaccaro, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Dat Le, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Haneet Chadha, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Fatima Maqsood, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Sandra Rabat, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Alexander Silva, OMS-II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Erin McFadden, Internal Medicine Faculty Physician, Regional Director Medical Education, The Wright Center for Community Health

Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):
  • Aishwarya Majumdar, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Catherine Lau, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Erin McFadden, Internal Medicine Faculty Physician, Regional Director Medical Education, The Wright Center for Community Health
  • Tanisha Mitra, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Alonso Abugattas, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Margaret McGrath, OMSII, A. T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Christopher Vaccaro, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Dat Le, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Haneet Chadha, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Fatima Maqsood, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Sandra Rabat, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Alexander Silva, OMS II, A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Hepatitis C Treatment and Management Efficacy in a Primary Care Setting

Aug 19, 2021 12:02am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:02am

Identification: CP3

CP3 - Hepatitis C Treatment and Management Efficacy in a Primary Care Setting

Poster Type: Innovation

Category: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement

Issue or Challenge: Hepatitis C (HCV) is a highly prevalent infectious disease in Arizona. Despite its prevalence, many primary care providers feel unequipped to screen, diagnose, and treat HCV. This is largely due to the complexity and novel characteristics of HCV treatment along with persistent reliance on specialists to manage this disease. To address the growing burden in northern Arizona, this project aims to improve management of HCV by North Country HealthCare (NCHC) primary care providers (PCP’s) through an educational session on the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of HCV.

Description of Innovation: Once recruited, participants followed the steps for completion that were emailed to them and provided on a recruitment poster. Between March 1-15, 2021, participants completed an electronic pre-survey to assess baseline comfort in screening, diagnosing, and treating HCV. Participants then watched an hour-long pre-recorded educational video presented by a NCHC family physician and resident HCV expert. The video provided guidance on managing HCV positive patients in the primary care office. The presenter expanded on updated USPSTF HCV screening recommendations, 2030 World Health Organization HCV elimination goals, simplified pharmacotherapy for eligible patients, advanced pharmacotherapy for complex patients (non-genotype specific), treatment cessation, treatment restrictions, and monitoring for patient follow-up. Participants completed post-surveys identical to the pre-survey both immediately and two weeks (on or before March 29, 2021) after watching the video to assess change in knowledge and comfortability. The secondary post-survey, administered two weeks after the educational session was intended to assess sustained improvement in HCV management. The survey results were compared using Stata.

Impact or Result: Out of 81 eligible primary care providers at NCHC, ten agreed to complete the educational session (12.3%). Their knowledge of HCV treatment increased by 9.9% immediately after the education (95% CI: -11.6, 31.4; p-value: 0.3468). Providers without previous HCV training had higher average pre-education assessment scores (83.5%) and greater improvement in post-education assessment scores (16.5%) compared to providers with previous training (72.3%; 5.5%). Prevalence of comfortability in screening, diagnosing, and treating HCV increased from 3 to 8 providers, 2 to 7 providers, and 2 to 8 providers respectively. At the two-week follow up, 6 providers responded and scored 100% on the knowledge assessment. All 6 providers selected agree or strongly agree to questions assessing comfort level with screening and diagnosing, and 5 providers chose agree to comfort with treating.

Replicating this Innovation: Organizations may replicate this project by utilizing a provider or group of providers that possess knowledge of HCV management. Next, either a pre-recorded or live educational session could be developed to address HCV management. To incentivize providers to participate, CME credit may be offered, if applicable. Although a limitation within this study, improved participation could be assured by increasing publication of the session amongst providers at the organization. Having resident experts available may also reduce potential barriers as they offer expertise to providers who are new to HCV management. Developing clinic-specific treatment tools and guidelines may also increase sustained knowledge.

Author(s):

Riva Macbeth, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Annalise Wille, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Jasmine Dugal, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Justin Kleinman, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Justin Morin, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Joshua Sturgell, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Luke Allen, MPH, CPH, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Shahim Elja, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Steven Jang, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Rita Bybee, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Shipra Bansal, MD, A.T. Still University School of Medicine Arizona

Brandon Abbott, DO, North Country HealthCare

Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):
  • Riva Macbeth, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Annalise Wille, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Jasmine Dugal, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Justin Kleinman, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Justin Morin, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Joshua Sturgell, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Luke Allen, MPH, CPH, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Shahim Elja, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Steven Jang, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Rita Bybee, OMS II, Medical Student, ATSU-SOMA (A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona)
  • Stephen Raab, MD, MD, A.T. Still University School of Medicine Arizona - Flagstaff CHC
  • Shipra Bansal, MD, MD, A.T. Still University School of Medicine Arizona
  • Brandon Abbott, DO, DO, North Country HealthCare

Near North Quality Improvement Program: IPV Education, Awareness, and Resources

Aug 19, 2021 12:03am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:03am

Identification: CP4

CP4 - Near North Quality Improvement Program: IPV Education, Awareness, and Resources

Poster Type: Innovation

Category: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement

Issue or Challenge: Intimate partner violence is a widely prevalent issue and most significantly impacts women, especially in the city of Chicago. The health consequences of IPV are significant including chronic pain disorders, IBS, sexually transmitted infections, infertility, depression and anxiety, maternal mortality, suicide, and homicide. Despite this, a previous project at Near North Health found that there is minimal screening by their providers. The goal of this project is to increase the identification of patients experiencing IPV.

Description of Innovation: Colloquially, innovation implies newness–new technology, methods, or ideas. However, innovation in qualitative research can mean improvement of methods that have already been established. The goal of this experiment was the latter. Through the survey conducted by 10 A.T Still University students, Class of 2022, it was established that physicians at Near North Community Health Center (NNCHC) were not comfortable screening patients for IPV. We decided to address this issue through IPV education seminars to increase physicians' knowledge on IPV. This seminar explained risk factors, and equipped providers with tools and resources that they can provide to their IPV positive patients. Other resources are business cards that providers can give to patients containing IPV related information and resources. In addition, posters with information regarding IPV and a QR code for an IPV safety planning app will be posted in bathroom stalls of the clinic in an effort to increase patients’ comfortability in starting a conversation about IPV with their physicians. Through provider education, business cards, and posters, we aim to increase provider’s comfortability to screen patients for IPV at Near North Health Center.

Impact or Result: Our team created a training presentation to succinctly educate our providers on the current issues regarding IPV and how to best screen for IPV among their patients. We had six women’s health providers attend the training and complete pre- and post-training surveys. Our providers were asked to rate their knowledge of resources available for patients experiencing IPV prior to training (1-5) and subsequently asked the same question after training. We observed a positive trend regarding knowledge of resources, from an average of 2.67 prior to training to 4 after training. We also obtained important information regarding barriers to IPV screening. Multiple providers indicated that lack of time to screen patients as well as lack of time to discuss a positive IPV screen were seen as barriers to screen.

Replicating this Innovation: The importance of replicating this quality improvement project in other organizations cannot be understated. The educational presentation was created to educate women’s health providers at Near North Health Services on multiple aspects of IPV and improve provider comfortability in screening for IPV. Importantly, the educational presentation produced was succinct and straight forward. Moreover, while this program specifically focused on educating women’s health providers at one community health clinic, the content of the presentation - and the online format - lends itself to being easily accessible to multiple audiences.

Author(s):

Michael Dinh, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Grace Chen, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Ryan Abbott, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Trina Bhattarai, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Tanya Omar, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Donald Saylor, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Caroline DiNicola, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Clara Choi, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Daniel Muller, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Grace Narlock, OMS-II, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Speaker(s):
  • Michael Dinh, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Grace Chen, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Donald Saylor, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Tanya Omar, OMII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Caroline DiNicola, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Grace Narlock, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Daniel Muller, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Trina Bhattarai, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Clara Choi, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Ryan Abbott, OMSII, A.T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Teach-Back Method in Helping Patients Understand Their Diagnosis of Hypertension and/or Diabetes

Aug 19, 2021 12:04am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:04am

Identification: CP5

CP5 - Teach-Back Method in Helping Patients Understand Their Diagnosis of Hypertension and/or Diabetes

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Patient and Community Engagement; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement

Research Objectives: Our project aims at increasing health literacy in adult patients of Near North Health Services Corporation of Illinois with hypertension and/or diabetes using the Teach-Back Method. We also look at patient belief in knowledge about disease pre and post intervention, and evaluate how patients feel about the intervention.

Research Study Design/Methods: Investigators meet with patients before discharge following an outpatient appointment. A pre-educational survey is administered to assess patient knowledge of Hypertension or Diabetes. Education is provided on their applicable diagnosis through information sheets as part of the Teach-Back intervention. Patients are given an opportunity to discuss information learned from the intervention, following which, patients complete a post-educational survey that assesses their knowledge of disease following the intervention. The survey also assesses how patients feel about the intervention in helping them understand their diagnosis. Results from pre and post surveys are compared descriptively.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: There were 30 patients who participated in the intervention and completed both pre and post surveys. Prior to intervention, 53% felt that their understanding of the diagnosis was somewhat clear. However, post-intervention, 63% patients felt that their understanding of the disease was very clear. All respondents reported learning something from education provided. Additionally, most patients (83%) reported that the intervention helped them grasp their medical condition much better than previously felt. Most patients felt that providers need to use the Teach-back method to explain diagnosis.

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: The intervention empowers patients by increasing their knowledge about their condition and how to manage their disease. We hope that this intervention increases patient participation in their care, therefore leading to improved patient outcomes. As suggested by patients, our intervention can be incorporated in physician-patient interaction at discharge with new diagnosis for metabolic conditions at all health centers. Additionally, this intervention can be adapted to the management of various different chronic conditions which benefits from increased patient knowledge about diseases and engagement in care.

Authors:

Aveena Pelia, OMS-III, A.T. Still School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Trivianne Franklin, OMS-III, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Speaker(s):
  • Aveena Pelia, OMS-III, A.T. Still School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Trivianne Franklin, OMS-III, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Pour Some Sugar on Me: An Analysis of Diabetes Telehealth Follow-Ups

Aug 19, 2021 12:05am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:05am

Identification: CP6

CP6 - Pour Some Sugar on Me: An Analysis of Diabetes Telehealth Follow-Ups

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement; Technological Solutions and Tools to Improve Care and Population Health Management

Research Objectives: Diabetes rates in Tucson, AZ are high. During the COVID-19 pandemic, sociodemographic factors contributing to diabetes were further compounded by unemployment, virtual education, and fear of contracting COVID. These elements increased the use of telemedicine. This project assesses efficacy of telemedicine for diabetes follow-up and patient preferences for continued use.

Research Study Design/Methods: El Rio Health Center in Tucson, Az reports over 10,500 diabetic patients. Patients 18-75 years old with a documented HbA1c = 7.0 between July and December of 2020 were recruited. El Rio provided a list of 3,024 patients who met these criteria, and 100 patients were randomly selected to be contacted. Patients were called via Doximity dialer and asked to answer questions based on utilization of telehealth or in-person visits. Survey questions were verbally conveyed in English or Spanish related to diabetes control, satisfaction with healthcare visits, and likelihood of choosing telemedicine in the future.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: 38 of 100 patients agreed to complete the survey. Of those sampled, 24 used telemedicine between July and December of 2020, and the majority were satisfied versus dissatisfied with the care received (Question 6, P=.01). Responses for quality of diabetes management tended to be improved versus worse (P=.001). There is not enough evidence from responses to show if in-person visits provided greater quality of care in contrast to telemedicine visits (Questions 7 & 10, P=.16). Overall, responses showed patients are more likely to utilize telemedicine visits in the future (P=.006).

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: Responses demonstrated that patients who utilized telemedicine visits between July 2020 and December 2020 felt there was equal quality of care provided compared to in-person visits. A majority of patients expressed interest in continuing to utilize telemedicine in the future for diabetes follow-up visits. These results show the practicality and utilizability of telemedicine for the future management of patients with diabetes. This quality improvement project can be modeled by other clinics interested in assessing satisfaction with their telemedicine services.

Authors:

Nihaal Shah, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Courtney Alakan, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Brandon Poppe, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Jennifer Concepcion, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Charissa Greggory, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Ellis Kaufmann, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Michaela LaCorte, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Marissa Meyer, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Ashley Oalickal, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Trevor Swanson, OMS-II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Christopher Dixon, DO, Regional Director, Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Ray Wagner, MD, MS, FAAP, Regional Director, Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Ruth Garcia, Regional Director, Medical Education, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):
  • Nihaal Shah, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Courtney Alakan, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Brandon Poppe, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Jennifer Concepcion, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Charissa Greggory, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Ellis Kaufmann, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Michaela LaCorte, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Marissa Meyer, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Ashley Oalickal, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Trevor Swanson, OMS II, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Christopher Dixon, DO, Regional Director, Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Ray Wagner, MD, MS, FAAP, Regional Director, Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Ruth Garcia, Regional Director, Medical Education, A.T. Still University - School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Examining Patient and Provider Perspectives of Telemedicine in a Community Health Clinic Setting

Aug 19, 2021 12:06am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:06am

Identification: CP7

CP7 - Examining Patient and Provider Perspectives of Telemedicine in a Community Health Clinic Setting

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement

Research Objectives: Telemedicine usage has grown exponentially but little literature examines its use in community health clinics. This project examined patient and provider perceptions and experiences of telemedicine in two CHC settings with diverse patient populations in order to help participating sites improve and maximize their delivery of telemedicine.

Research Study Design/Methods: We are surveying patients at two CHCs in Brooklyn, including those who have and those who have not used telemedicine, using anonymous paper surveys which are collected in waiting rooms. Patient surveys assess usefulness, interface quality, ease of use, communication, access to telemedicine necessities, safety/security, and satisfaction. Surveys of those who have not used telemedicine also assess patient concerns regarding telemedicine. Demographic characteristics collected include race/ethnicity, primary language, gender, and age. Providers at the CHCs are surveyed via anonymous online survey distributed by email. Surveys assess usability, quality of communication, usefulness, perception of patient telemedicine experience, and satisfaction.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: Data collection is ongoing. 246 patients have been surveyed with a response rate of 68.7%. We will analyze results using statistical analysis and stratify by race/ethnicity, primary language, age, and gender to look for differences in findings. We will compare responses from patients who have used telemedicine compared to patients who have not to identify factors that differ between the groups, including differences in group characteristics and in perceptions of telemedicine. Provider survey results will be analyzed for trends and themes in the survey topics covered. Data collection will stop May 31 and results will be ready June 14.

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: We hope our findings will provide greater insight into the usage and acceptability of telemedicine amongst vulnerable patients. Findings will be presented to participating sites’ administrations and may inform them of ways to improve their telemedicine service for both providers and patients as well as how to cater telemedicine to their specific patient populations and address barriers. Although our findings are not generalizable, other CHCs can use a similar methodology and survey system to assess their usage of telemedicine, and can learn from our findings as they consider ways to improve their own telemedicine programs.

Authors:

Emilie Doan Van, MPH, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Anirudh Singhal, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Niloufar Akhavan Tabib, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Ryan Andrade, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Mark Calandra, BSN, RN, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Myrna Hanna, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Tahmin Hassan, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Peter Oro, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Richelle Reznik, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Dhipthika Srinivasan, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Laura Grady, DO, Regional Director of Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Norma Villanueva, MD, MPH, Regional Director of Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):
  • Emilie Doan Van, MPH, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Anirudh Singhal, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Ryan Andrade, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Peter Oro, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Kate Whelihan, MPH, CPH, COPC and Public Health Research Specialist, Department of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Mark Calandra, BSN, RN, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Tahmin Hassan, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Laura Grady, DO, Regional Director of Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD, FACP, Professor, Medicine and Public Health Chair, SOMA Dept. of Public Health, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Norma Villanueva, M.D, M.P.H, Regional Director of Medical Education, A T Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Richelle Reznik, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Myrna Hanna, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Dhipthika Srinivasan, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
  • Niloufar Akhavan Tabib, OMS-II, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Virtual Health and Wellness Program for Elementary Students

Aug 19, 2021 12:07am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:07am

Identification: CP8

CP8 - Virtual Health and Wellness Program for Elementary Students

Poster Type: Innovation

Primary Funding Source: A.T. Still University

Category: A. T. Still University; Patient and Community Engagement; Social Determinants of Health

Issue or Challenge: The COVID-19 pandemic presented many challenges, and one faced by adolescents was distance learning. A needs assessment, conducted with Family HealthCare Network (FHCN) in Tulare County, identified the need for supportive services for adolescents. An open forum held with the FQHC in September 2020 demonstrated the mental health problems experienced by students during distance learning, such as increased anxiety and feelings of isolation. This project’s goal was to evaluate the success of a virtual wellness program designed to support the mental welfare of children as they navigate online learning as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Description of Innovation: A needs assessment was completed in the community through FHCN, a Federally Funded Health Center, and it was identified that adolescent mental health, in the face of online learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic, was a challenge that had yet to be addressed. We formed a partnership with a local elementary school and gained their support for this project. We chose five health and wellness topics that would encourage children to be active and to engage in wellness activities outside of their classroom work: aerobic exercise, guided meditation, yoga, origami, and nutrition. Utilizing professional filming and editing, we filmed 5 videos on these topics. The videos were designed to be engaging and applicable but also educational for children. Over the course of 5 weeks, we released 5 wellness-based videos through the school that were distributed to students, with attached surveys for feedback on these videos. Students were encouraged to participate with a raffle where students could win prizes that were related to the wellness videos and survey completion. Videos will also be made permanently available to students through the school’s own Google Classroom.

Impact or Result: Data collection is ongoing, but videos released thus far were met with positive reception. From 2/25/21-3/25/21, 4 videos were released, which have collectively received 136 views. These videos require direct links to view, so the 136 views were solely completed by students at the participating school. Following the project’s completion, the school will make all 5 videos available to students through Google Classroom. Feedback received via the 31 surveys received thus far has been positive. Several students praised how the videos taught them beneficial calming techniques, and others liked the high engagement level. Complaints addressed video length, demonstration clarity, and small editing recommendations. One video has yet to be released. All video surveys will be open until 4/15/21. Overall, this project has received positive feedback from students, and will hopefully improve students’ wellbeing and enhance the health of the community.

Replicating this Innovation: This innovation can be replicated in other organizations and would be beneficial due to its emphasis on adolescent health which will hopefully influence the overall health of the community. Strategic partnerships with organizations that serve the community en masse, like FHCN in this project, and nearby schools may be beneficial to extending the program’s reach. Modifications can be made to the type of wellness content depending on the specific community, organizational, or adolescent needs.

Author(s):

Aaron Lai, A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine at Arizona

Sayeh Akhavan, A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine at Arizona

Speaker(s):
  • Aaron Lai, Mr., A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine at Arizona
  • Sayeh Akhavan, Ms., A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine at Arizona

Reviewing the Medical Utility of Incorporating Racial Identifiers in Common Diagnostic Tools

Aug 19, 2021 12:08am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:08am

Identification: CP9

CP9 - Reviewing the Medical Utility of Incorporating Racial Identifiers in Common Diagnostic Tools

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement; Social Determinants of Health

Research Objectives: To identify the usefulness of racial identifiers in 6 commonly used healthcare diagnostic tests. Through literature review, evidence against the use of racial identifiers in some diagnostic tests were found. Our aim is to increase awareness of this evidence and how racial identifiers have been used in these diagnostic tests.

Research Study Design/Methods: Our project started with a literature review of 6 diagnostic tools that commonly reference racial identifiers. We gained a better understanding of how race plays a part in these tests and corresponding conditions. Based on what was learned, we created an informational video of our findings and presented it to providers at HealthPoint, who then completed a qualitative survey that included questions assessing their opinions on how the racial identifiers were used and their interest in learning more about racism in healthcare. As an incentive for participation, a free catered lunch was offered to the site with the most participants.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: After investigation, VBAC, STONE, Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and DEXA lacked sufficient evidence to support continued use of racial identifiers. Bilitool and Hemoglobinopathy screening has evidence supporting continued use of self-identified race until a better method is clinically available. Overall, the providers’ responses (n=60) supported that they understood and agreed with the evidence presented. Over 60% of providers agreed the use of race lacked support in VBAC (83.33%, n=50), STONE (78.33%, n=47), Breast Cancer Risk Assessment (61.67%, n=37) and DEXA screening (66.77%, n=40). Maintaining self-identified race in BiliTool and Hemoglobinopathy was more controversial with 48.33% (n=29) supporting continued inclusion.

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: Overall, our project showed that the validity of including racial identifiers in patient care is varied, and the literature is limited. We also need to consider if race is being included as a proxy for social determinants of health, such as access to care, income and social status. Using it this way, it disregards the diversity of social determinants of health within each racial category. Further research should be conducted before using racial identifiers, as unnecessary usage, except in the case of a biologically significant association, has the potential to lead to unnecessary testing or worsened health outcomes.

Authors:

Naomi Mathews, OMS-II, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine



Team-Based Approach Including Behavioral Health, Nutritionist, and Primary-Care Physician to Improve Weight Management in Obese Patients at Community Health Centers

Aug 19, 2021 12:09am ‐ Aug 19, 2021 12:09am

Identification: CP10

CP10 - Team-Based Approach Including Behavioral Health, Nutritionist, and Primary-Care Physician to Improve Weight Management in Obese Patients at Community Health Centers

Poster Type: Research

Track/Topic: A. T. Still University; Behavioral Health Services; Quality of Care and Quality Improvement; Social Determinants of Health

Research Objectives: Determine whether a team-based approach for weight management during the same office visit would improve weight management for obese patients at CHC.To effectively educate patients to identify barriers regarding their weight management and learn alternatives in their diet. To increase patient's satisfaction with weight management at CHC.

Research Study Design/Methods: Patients were recruited from a single healthcare provider’s population base before their visit. Inclusion criteria included patients over the age of 18 and a BMI over 30. Patients first met with their PCP for standard of care, followed by 10-minute visits with behavioral health and nutritionist separately. Afterwards, a post-survey questionnaire was filled. The survey consisted of 4 questions with a score ranging from 1-5, and It also included a comments section for qualitative data. Patients were followed up in one year to compare changes in BMI since the initial visit and with a phone interview.

Research Principal Findings and Quantitative/Qualitative Results: In total, 20 patients were enrolled in the study (11 males and 9 females). Mean age in years(SD) and BMI(SD) were 49.4(11.52) and 34.17(2.8), respectively. The mean score(SD) for the first post-survey question regarding overall satisfaction was 4.75(0.44). The mean score(SD) for the second post-survey question regarding behavioral health specialist was 4.70(0.47). The mean score(SD) for the third post-survey question regarding the nutritionist representative was 4.70(0.47). The mean score for the fourth post-survey question regarding motivation for weight loss was 4.75(0.44). There was no significant difference in change in BMI between initial and post one-year visit, 33.59 vs 33.79 (p=0.41).

Research Conclusions on Impact on Health Centers: Patients rated high scores in the post-survey questionnaire, with mean score averages all being higher than 4.7/5. Overall, most patients at the initial visit said that this team-based approach provided additional and helpful information about weight management when compared to speaking with just their PCP. COVID-19 played a significant factor in the one-year follow-ups on participants in terms of their BMI. This team-based approach strategy for weight management can be effective for patients at CHC. We recommend expanding the current study to include larger sample size, expanded to multiple CHC sites, and measuring long-term assessment of team-based approach post-COVID-pandemic.

Authors:

Nobel Nguyen, OMS, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine


Speaker(s):
  • Nobel Nguyen, Medical Student, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine
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